Discipleship Essentials

From the Discipleship Essentials website Discipleship Essentials is a media-assisted, multi-lingual discipleship training tool. It is intended for open use by agencies and individuals to supplement their efforts to equip believers so they can first be discipled and then disciple others in their Christian walk. It is developed for lay leaders to use in small groups as well as one-on-one training; for young church pastors to have a series of initial sermons or teaching tools for their new congregations; and for the church growth movement. Each component can be repurposed for distribution through various methods, including audio players, web streaming or download, smart phones, tablet apps, as well as traditional broadcast methods. www.discipleshipessentials.org

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Christian Churches and Immigrant Support in Canada: An Organizational Ecology Perspective

by Sam Reimer, Mark Chapman, Rich Janzen, James Watson, and Michael Wilkinson Abstract: Canada receives roughly 250,000 immigrants each year, and the government spends considerable resources on assisting them to settle and integrate into Canadian society through the agencies they support. Most of these new immigrants settle in Canada’s largest cities, where churches meet specific needs that extend beyond the capacities of government agencies. In smaller centers, churches cover a wide range of services because few government supports are available. Little is known about the work of churches in Canada in spite of their importance to immigrant settlement and integration. In this study, we examine the services offered to immigrants by Canadian Christian churches. We show how the service provision of Christian churches is constrained by other organizations and groups in their environment, in ways consonant with the organizational ecology framework. Specifically, churches service the needs of immigrants by adapting to specific niche needs and by filling in gaps left by other service providers. Reference: Reimer, Sam, Mark Chapman, Rich Janzen, James Watson, and Michael Wilkinson. 2016. Christian Churches and Immigrant Support in Canada: An Organizational Ecology Perspective. Review of Religious Research 1-19. http://link.springer.com/10.1007/s13644-016-0252-7 To access this article: 1. Login to

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Creating a World of Welcome: On Mission at Home

 By Mark Chapman Syrian refugees are in the news but Canadian churches have been developing relationships with immigrants since immigrants first arrived on the shores of what is now Canada. The recent needs of Syrian refugees and the ongoing diversification of Canadian society have brought immigrants concerns to the attention of churches across Canada.   “What was once true only in Toronto and Vancouver is now true in places like Prince Albert, Saskatchewan and small communities in New Brunswick and places like that… These are communities that have been stable and white and are now being infused with color and accent. The huge cities weren’t ready for it 15 years ago, and the churches in the small towns are not ready for it now. We need to help them take on the challenge that’s before them.” A recent project on the Role of Churches in Immigrant Settlement and Integration aimed to help meet this need. The good news is that most churches already have the resources they need to make a difference. Canadian churches are happy to have immigrants come to their churches but they sometimes know little about how to help immigrants establish themselves in Canada or in the

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What It Takes to Truly Be ‘One of Us’

By Bruce Stokes and Rhonda Stewart The tide of people moving across the world, be they immigrants or refugees, has sparked concern in Australia, Europe and the United States. In particular, the ethnic, linguistic and cultural background of migrants has triggered intense debates over the benefits and the costs of growing diversity and the risk of open borders to national identity. Unease over the cultural, economic and security ramifications of immigration helped to fuel the Brexit vote in the United Kingdom, encourage the idea of a wall along the U.S.-Mexican border and broaden support for right-wing populist parties in France, Germany and the Netherlands.

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