Christian Churches and Immigrant Support in Canada: An Organizational Ecology Perspective

by Sam Reimer, Mark Chapman, Rich Janzen, James Watson, and Michael Wilkinson Abstract: Canada receives roughly 250,000 immigrants each year, and the government spends considerable resources on assisting them to settle and integrate into Canadian society through the agencies they support. Most of these new immigrants settle in Canada’s largest cities, where churches meet specific needs that extend beyond the capacities of government agencies. In smaller centers, churches cover a wide range of services because few government supports are available. Little is known about the work of churches in Canada in spite of their importance to immigrant settlement and integration. In this study, we examine the services offered to immigrants by Canadian Christian churches. We show how the service provision of Christian churches is constrained by other organizations and groups in their environment, in ways consonant with the organizational ecology framework. Specifically, churches service the needs of immigrants by adapting to specific niche needs and by filling in gaps left by other service providers. Reference: Reimer, Sam, Mark Chapman, Rich Janzen, James Watson, and Michael Wilkinson. 2016. Christian Churches and Immigrant Support in Canada: An Organizational Ecology Perspective. Review of Religious Research 1-19. http://link.springer.com/10.1007/s13644-016-0252-7 To access this article: 1. Login to

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What It Takes to Truly Be ‘One of Us’

By Bruce Stokes and Rhonda Stewart The tide of people moving across the world, be they immigrants or refugees, has sparked concern in Australia, Europe and the United States. In particular, the ethnic, linguistic and cultural background of migrants has triggered intense debates over the benefits and the costs of growing diversity and the risk of open borders to national identity. Unease over the cultural, economic and security ramifications of immigration helped to fuel the Brexit vote in the United Kingdom, encourage the idea of a wall along the U.S.-Mexican border and broaden support for right-wing populist parties in France, Germany and the Netherlands.

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